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dc.contributor.authorChapman, Allyeng
dc.date.issued2018eng
dc.description.abstractThe outer narrative frame of Frankenstein consists of Robert Walton’s letters sent from Russia to his sister who lives in his native England. He laments his friendlessness and confesses his apprehensions for his future: he desperately wants the glory of discovering the northern pole, “a part of the world never before visited,” which he believes to be a utopia, “a land surpassing in wonders and in beauty every region hitherto discovered on the habitable globe” (Shelley 7). He finally finds a friend when Victor Frankenstein becomes stranded in the ice while tracking the being he created years before. Walton’s letters to his sister then become a manuscript of Victor’s narrative.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/63259
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri, College of Arts and Scienceseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectFrankenstein, sexualityeng
dc.titleIn my own mode : intersections of identity in Frankensteineng


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