[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMerrill, Dennis
dc.contributor.authorPloth, Kevin M.
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018 Spring
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page viewed May 18, 2018
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dennis Merrill
dc.descriptionVita
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 47-49)
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Department of History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2018
dc.description.abstractHistorians often criticize Patrick J. Hurley for the failure of his diplomatic mission to China in 1944-1945. Instead of acting as an impartial mediator during the negotiations between the Guomindang (GMD) and Chinese Communist Party (CCP), Hurley aligned U.S. policy with the GMD’s leader, Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek), who would come to lose the civil war against the Chinese Communists. Hurley’s unique position to create foreign policy resulted in the implementation of what became the established long-term policy in China. This policy eventually alienated the CCP and lead to the severing of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China for decades. Although historians have long since blamed Hurley’s personality and lack of understanding for the mission’s failure, no one has studied the role cultural influences had in shaping his attitudes and decisions. Hurley’s perception of China’s key actors and his own American colleagues, along with his subsequent behaviors, grew out of his life experiences, especially his cultural understandings of gender and class. Working-class men in the United States from the early-nineteenth to the early-twentieth century often fostered an aggressive model of manhood that opposed the Victorian values of the middle and upper classes. Instead of valuing restraint and respectability, social norms which governed behavior in modern business offices and in respectable middle-class family life, these men valued the display of passion and physical assertiveness. Hurley was largely influenced by this form of masculinity, which has been labeled “primitive manhood.” Constructions of gender and class can also be interconnected. Different socioeconomic classes often embrace varying ideals of proper gender roles. Hurley’s working-class origins and values would clash with the middle and upper-class backgrounds of the various State Department Foreign Service officers who counseled compromise with the CCP. His assimilation of these cultural constructs negatively affected his relationships with these diplomats and the CCP, resulting in his expulsion of all China experts who disagreed with his policy. No one was left to voice alternative viewpoints to Hurley’s successor, George Marshall, who ultimately continued Hurley’s misguided policy of upholding Jiang’s regime.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- A review of the scholarly literature on Sino-American relations -- Gender and class and Hurley's developing years -- The Guomindang, the Communists, and the China Hands -- Hurley's arrives in China and cleans house -- Hurley: he-man diplomacy -- Opposition silences, Hurley's policy wins
dc.description.tableofcontentsvii, 50 pages
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/63286
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
dc.subject.lcshHurley, Patrick J. (Patrick Jay), 1883-1963
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- 1933-1945
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- China
dc.subject.lcshMasculinity -- United States
dc.subject.lcshMasculinity -- Political aspects
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- History
dc.titleWhen Cultures Collide: How Primitive Masculinity and Class Conflict Derailed the Patrick J. Hurley Diplomatic Mission to China, 1944-1945eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (UMKC)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas City
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameM.A.


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record