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dc.contributor.authorMarch, Kathryn S.eng
dc.date.issued1997-03eng
dc.descriptionAt stake in my presentation are two central reflections. First is the question of whether or not power and resistance, hegemony and autonomy, interact in the same way between women and men, and more specifically between contemporary Tamang men and women from central highland Nepal, as has been described between colonial authorities and local peoples in wider South Asia. To the extent that gendered and other forms of domination are not isomorphic, of course, an important subsidiary question arises: if present understandings of colonialism and postcoloniality are inadequate to disassemble gender, then, is this more because gender is different, or more because subaltern studies are inadequate?eng
dc.descriptionIssue title; "South Asian Oral Traditions."eng
dc.format.extent39 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 12/1 (1997): 134-172.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/64767
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.titleTwo houses and the pain of separation in Tamang narratives from highland Nepaleng
dc.typeArticleeng


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