[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHolmberg, Ingrideng
dc.date.issued1998-10eng
dc.descriptionTodorov's description of textual interdependence represents a fictional construct or web of narrative that certain critics attempt to identify and analyze.1 In a sense, this type of critic involves herself or himself in a constant pursuit of the lost paradise of a pure and unified text. Ancient Greek literature, however, provides us with access to a narrative tradition that approximates this single text: the oral tradition of which the Iliad and the Odyssey are the most prominent remains. We also possess in much more fragmentary form other narratives that belonged to the oral epic tradition; these comprise the epic cycle. In this paper I will examine the fall from narrative grace that the creation of the fixed texts of the Iliad and the Odyssey imposed upon the unified and universalizing oral tradition of the epic cycle.eng
dc.descriptionNoteeng
dc.format.extent23 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 13/2 (1998): 456-478.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65052
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.titleThe creation of the Ancient Greek epic cycleeng
dc.typeArticleeng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record