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dc.contributor.authorVanderBilt, Deboraheng
dc.date.issued1998-10eng
dc.descriptionThe focus of oral studies in Anglo-Saxon literature has been primarily on poetic texts; the poetry's oral-formulaic language and its way of transforming narratives according to its own traditional idiom have made it a fascinating area of study. Within this field, however, critical analysis has deepened from early, often rote applications of the Parry-Lord theory toward more precise consideration of the "tradition-dependent" features of oraltraditional texts in Old English, features that may or may not find parallels in texts from other oral cultures.1 Additionally, the direction of oral studies of the past two decades in medieval literature generally as well as in Anglo- Saxon literature in particular has included issues of audience, reception, and transmission--what we might characterize as the dynamics of orality, that is, how orality operates as one of the "socially conditioned and socially functional modes of approach to the transmission of knowledge" (Bauml 1980:246).
dc.descriptionNote
dc.format.extent21 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 13/2 (1998): 377-397.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65055
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.titleTranslation and orality in the Old English Orosiuseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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