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dc.contributor.authorUgochukwu, Francoiseeng
dc.date.issued2006-10eng
dc.descriptionFolktales from both countries could have benefited from such an available and growing vocabulary. Yet this study of more than 300 texts found them to be rather colorless, except for the occasional mention of white and black, and also red and green, those colors most easily captured by the eye (Tornay 1978:xix); other colors hardly ever appear in the texts. This situation leads one to question the role and interpretation of colors in folktales, a field that has seldom attracted attention so far, apart from Gorog-Karady's work (1976) on the image of black and white in African oral literature and focusing on the relationship between Africans and Europeans.7eng
dc.descriptionNoteeng
dc.format.extent19 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 21/2 (2006): 250-268.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65082
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleThe Devil's colors : A comparative study of French and Nigerian folktaleseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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