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dc.contributor.authorDasylva, Ademola O.eng
dc.date.issued2006-10eng
dc.descriptionIf "education" is the process of knowledge acquisition, "culture education" emphasizes the peculiar means and methods of instruction by which a society imparts its body of values and mores in the pursuance and attainment of the society's collective vision, aspirations, and goals. Thus, anyone who demonstrates a degree of knowledge of his or her societal values and general education is said to be educated. In other words, "culture education," as intended here, presupposes conscious and refined methods of acquisition and/or dissemination of the knowledge of societal values, philosophy, hermeneutics, and so on. "Culture education" is the means by which skills are developed in such areas as language, oral traditions and customs, music, dance, rituals, festivals, traditional medicine, foodways, and architecture, as well as the internalization and socialization of societal values and skills by individuals in a way that engenders cultural adaptability, flexibility, and societal cohesion. Thus, "culture education" ultimately refers to a people's pedagogy of cultural values, the teaching methodologies and means of dissemination, the acquisition of culture for the purpose of socialization, and the promotion of an ideal social order.eng
dc.descriptionQuotation marks removed from title to ensure alphabetical order. Difference as follows; "Culture Education" and the Challenge of Globalization in Modern Nigeriaeng
dc.format.extent17 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 21/2 (2006): 325-341.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65085
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleCulture education and the challenge of globalization in modern Nigeriaeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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