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dc.contributor.authorZedda, Paulueng
dc.date.issued2009-03eng
dc.descriptionI shall consider in this paper the kind of oral poetry that was called cantus amoebaeus1 by the Romans, based upon a poetic joust between two or more poets who improvise their verse in search of public approval. This is, and has been, a widespread genre in various separate cultures, and it has to be considered a unique chapter within the entirety of the oral poetic tradition. Some of the styles adopted in this specific form of oral poetry are so common and recurrent that they seem to derive more from an innate need in people than from their cultural education, and they can be considered universal to this genre.2 Different traditions are, however, distinguished by many other characteristics that define their extremely lively, varied, and versatile nature.eng
dc.descriptionNoteeng
dc.format.extent38 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 24/1 (2009): 3-40.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65167
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleThe southern Sardinian tradtition of the Mutetu Longu : A functional analysiseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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