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dc.contributor.authorFishman, Talyaeng
dc.date.issued2010-03eng
dc.descriptionIn order to put to rest the claim of Jewish culture's putative preference for oral over written transmission, the first part of this study will reconstruct the historical contexts within which Jewish endorsements of oral transmission were formulated, both in antiquity and in the period of the Geonim, that is, the "Eminences" who presided over post-talmudic rabbinical academies in the area of Baghdad between the seventh and eleventh centuries. The second part will discuss performative strategies that rabbinic Jews used in order to tag certain corpora as "oral," even when the latter clearly existed as written texts. Widespread use of inscribed texts of oral matters did not alter rabbinic society's need to preserve a classification that distinguished sharply between two types of transmission, and it did not diminish the cultural meaning of this taxonomy. Finally, stimulated by studies on early Muslim resistance to .adith inscription undertaken by Cook (1997), Menahem Kister (1998), and Gregor Schoeler (1989 and 2006), the third part will ruminate on the timing and regional specificity of admonitions to guard the oral transmission of tradition that were articulated in eighth- and ninth-century Iraq by Muslims and Jews alike.eng
dc.descriptionIssue title: Oral Tradition in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.eng
dc.format.extent16 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 25/1 (2010): 41-56.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65204
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleGuarding oral transmission : Within and between cultureseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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