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dc.contributor.authorFoly, John Mileseng
dc.contributor.authorGejin, Chaoeng
dc.date.issued2012-10eng
dc.descriptionIn this paper we propose to examine some fundamental issues in comparative oral epic. Our investigation will proceed across four epic traditions widely separated in space and time. Two of them, the Mongolian and South Slavic epic, are or were recently still living and therefore observable by fieldworkers. The other two, the ancient Greek and Old English epic traditions, are preserved only in manuscript form. Although no comparative treatment can ever claim to be exhaustive or universal, we feel that these four witnesses represent considerable diversity and collectively offer a chance to forge a suitably nuanced model for oral epic. We welcome responses from scholars in other fields, especially Africanists, as we all search for ways to understand the international phenomenon of oral epic.eng
dc.format.extent38 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 27/2 (2012): 381-418.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65268
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.titleChallenges in comparative oral epiceng
dc.typeArticleeng


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