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dc.contributor.authorPettitt, Tomeng
dc.date.issued2013-03eng
dc.descriptionIn the meantime, the present study explores the evolution of the other "red barn" ballad to make it into oral tradition, "The Suffolk Tragedy" (Roud 18814). In quantitative terms its impact has been far less impressive--three broadside printings and four singers--but by another criterion, geographical diffusion, it did much better, with two of those four singers being natives of New South Wales.2 In focusing mainly on these Australian variants, this study continues and completes (with occasional retrospective corrections) an earlier study of the transmission of "The Suffolk Tragedy" presented in this journal (Pettitt 2009) but for reasons of space restricted originally to the longer of the two English versions. It is also an opportunity more generally to draw attention to the significance of its Australian diaspora for the study of English folksong, a significance which is founded on the strength of Australian tradition, ensured by the energy and professionalism of the folklorists who recorded it, and enabled both by their generosity in sharing their material and by the efficiency and courtesy of the National Library of Australia in respectively curating and facilitating access to its holdings.//eng
dc.format.extent30 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 28/1 (2013): 5-34.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65283
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.titleText and memory in the "oral" transmission of a crime and execution ballad : "The Suffolk Tragedy" in England and Australiaeng


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