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dc.contributor.authorLyle, Emilyeng
dc.date.issued2012-03eng
dc.descriptionKnowledge must be very differently organized in an oral culture than it is in one with writing and, of course, memory is the key. People remember through time, and the memory of an individual is limited in extent. A society may organize itself in such a way as to maximize the common store of what is remembered and may also find ways of setting aside those matters that lie outside its memory range. In this article I aim to formulate a descriptive model for a society that operates in terms of what I call a "memory capsule" of four generations that provides an expectation of recollection over a period of about a hundred years.eng
dc.descriptionIssue title: In Memoriam John Miles Foley January 22, 1947-May 3, 2012.eng
dc.format.extent10 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 27/1 (2012): 161-170.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65300
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.titleStepping stones through timeeng


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