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dc.contributor.authorElmer, Davideng
dc.date.issued2013-10eng
dc.descriptionWhen he assembled the recordings and texts that today form the core of the collection bearing his name, Milman Parry was pursuing very different goals than many, if not most, folklorists and collectors of his time. Partly, perhaps, that is because he was not himself a folklorist by profession. At the time of his death in 1935, Parry was Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin at Harvard University, specializing in the study of the Iliad and Odyssey. When he set out for what was then the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in the summer of 1933, he was interested above all in testing a hypothesis he had formed about the way in which the Homeric poems had been composed--a hypothesis that later became known as the "Oral-Formulaic Theory."1 Parry approached his task as a scientist and an experimentalist. While others might have focused on discovering previously unknown epics, Parry deliberately spent time recording multiple versions of songs he had already documented, so as to understand better the manner in which they were recomposed in performance.
dc.descriptionNote
dc.format.extent14 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 28/2 (2013): 341-354.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65316
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleThe Milman Parry collection of oral literatureeng


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