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dc.contributor.authorMarmur, Michaeleng
dc.date.issued2014-03eng
dc.descriptionInterest in the phenomenon of quotation as a feature of culture has never been greater. Recent works by Regier (2010), Morson (2011) and Finnegan (2011) offer many important insights into a practice notable both for its ubiquity and yet for its specificity. In this essay I want to consider one of the oldest and most diverse of world cultures from the perspective of quotation. While debates abound as to whether the "cultures of the Jews"2 can be regarded integrally, this essay will suggest that the act of quotation both in literary and oral settings is a constant in Jewish cultural creativity throughout the ages. By attempting to delineate some of the key functions of quotation in these various Jewish contexts, some contribution to the understanding of what is arguably a "universal human propensity" (Finnegan 2011:11) may be made.//eng
dc.format.extent42 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 29/1 (2014): 5-46.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65334
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.titleWhy Jews quoteeng


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