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dc.contributor.advisorCameron, Glen T.eng
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Franzine Biebleng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on January 21, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Glen Cameron.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstractA case study with an Army aviation unit was conducted to determine what factors in Cameron's contingency theory contribute to how Army rear-detachment commanders and family readiness group leaders communicate with families in their unit during a deployment, as well as how the families perceive and respond to the communication they receive. In addition, the case study, which included a two-month communication audit, in-depth interviews and a survey, evaluated the stances and strategies of unit leadership as they moved along the continuum from advocacy to accommodation. Results support the application of the contingency theory of accommodation to military unit leadership during times of deployment. Although unit leadership tended to advocate more than accommodate, the information communicated affected if and when unit leadership moved along the continuum toward accommodation. Two factors were found to trigger a shift in communication stances and strategies by unit leadership: the intended recipient of the communication and the source of the message. Although the presence of strong predisposing variables made Army units more likely to advocate, situational variables allowed the possibility for dynamic communication. The public was satisfied with the communication they received, and the findings suggested that FRG members responded favorably to the communication they received and felt positively toward unit leadership.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentv, 73 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb73393630eng
dc.identifier.oclc501180842eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6533eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6533
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Armyeng
dc.subject.lcshFamilies of military personnel -- Services foreng
dc.subject.lcshDeployment (Strategy)eng
dc.subject.lcshCommunications, Militaryeng
dc.subject.lcshSoldiers -- Correspondenceeng
dc.titleBattle on the home front : a contingency approach to analyzing how an army unit communicates with families during a deploymenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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