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dc.contributor.authorReece, Steveeng
dc.date.issued2011-10eng
dc.descriptionMy contribution to this Festschrift for Professor John Miles Foley has its origin in an experimental course on comparative oral traditions titled "The Singers of Tales" that I have taught three times in quite different formats, once at Vanderbilt University and twice at Saint Olaf College. I began envisioning this course at the 1992 NEH Summer Seminar on Comparative Oral Traditions administered by Professor Foley in his capacity as the director of the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition at the University of Missouri. The seminar was one of the most pleasant, productive, and pivotal experiences of my academic career, largely because of the warm collegiality of my eleven colleagues and the generous mentoring of Professor Foley, and it continues to this day to have an effect on both my teaching and research.
dc.descriptionIssue title: Festschrift for John Miles Foley. This article belongs to a special issue of Oral Tradition published in honor of John Miles Foley's 65th birthday and 2011 retirement. The surprise Festschrift, guest-edited by Lori and Scott Garner entirely without his knowledge, celebrates John's tremendous impact on studies in oral tradition through a series of essays contributed by his students from the University of Missouri-Columbia (1979-present) and from NEH Summer Seminars that he has directed (1987-1996).
dc.format.extent30 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationOral Tradition, 26/2 (2011): 299-326.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/65403
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titleToward an ethnopoetically grounded edition of Homer's Odysseyeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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