Weed management and nitrogen loss in glyphosate-resistant corn (Zea mays)

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Weed management and nitrogen loss in glyphosate-resistant corn (Zea mays)

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/6568

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dc.contributor.advisor Smeda, R. J. (Reid John), 1960- en_US
dc.contributor.author Smith, Chad Lee en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-12T21:07:11Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-12T21:07:11Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2009 Spring en_US
dc.identifier.other SmithC-060209-T1556 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/6568
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on January 22, 2010). en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. Reid J. Smeda. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description M.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Agronomy. en_US
dc.description.abstract The advent of glyphosate-resistant corn in Missouri has changed traditional reemergence (PRE) followed by postemeregence (POST) herbicide programs to ones that predominately utilize glyphosate POST. POST only programs can allow early season weed competition. The objective was to determine the efficacy of one and two-pass programs using PRE and POST herbicides in glyphosate-resistant corn and to quantitate the nitrogen loss from various application timings in POST glyphosate weed control. The first study composed of one-pass and two-pass herbicide weed control programs. Weed control failures occurred 29% more often using one-pass systems compared to two-pass programs utilizing PREs and yield reductions occurred more often in one-pass systems. Overall, two-pass systems which included the use of a PRE herbicide resulted in more consistent weed control across all species than one-pass POST treatments. The second study consisted of PRE herbicide treatments to favor grass, broadleaf, or mixed weed populations at multiple glyphosate application timings. To document nitrogen loss, weed biomass, leaf chlorophyll meter readings, and stalk nitrate testing was measured. Grass weeds were more detrimental to yield than broadleaf weeds. Chlorophyll meter readings documented nitrogen deficiency between treatments. Corn leaf chlorophyll meter readings taken at tasseling correlated strongly to the resultant grain yield (R2 [greater than or equal to] .84). Higher year-end stalk nitrate accumulations were reflective of higher grain yield. en_US
dc.format.extent vii, 107 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Glyphosate en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Herbicide-resistant crops en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Corn -- Weed control en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Crops -- Effect of nitrogen on en_US
dc.title Weed management and nitrogen loss in glyphosate-resistant corn (Zea mays) en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Agronomy en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.S. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b73398731 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 501320819 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theses
dc.relation.ispartofcollection 2009 Freely available theses (MU)


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