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dc.contributor.advisorDesRosiers, Nathanieleng
dc.contributor.authorImler, Henryeng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 18, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Nathaniel DesRosier.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Religious studies.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The wildly popular Acts of Thomas is an invaluable artifact of early Christian literature because it details the struggles that Christian communities had with local authorities once Christianity had transitioned from a superstition to a religion. The text displayed a considerable amount of fluidity, being adapted by local Christians to better suit their own communities. The popularity of the Acts of Thomas in the 3rd to 8th centuries in the Roman Empire attests to the power the Thomasine Christians' story had in helping other Christians cope with their common experiences. The Acts of Thomas is an apocryphal account of the Apostle Thomas' commission and mission to India. It was composed in the early third century somewhere in the vicinity of Edessa in Roman Syria. The writers of this document within it both encoded their community's experiences within Edessa and the surrounding countryside and prescribed their values and imagined communal experiences within the narrative. This celibate apocalyptic work encouraged its readers to completely reject the outside world in favor of its internal community. Their celibate apocalypticism lead to the persecution of the group, not by the imperial government, but by local paterfamiliarum whose families had been partially converted to this brand of celibate Christianity. The group responded to this threat by a variety of means, chief among which were strategies of confusion through their hidden transcript and an appeal to their apocalyptic framework.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 128 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc551765080eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6599
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6599eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2009 MU restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshThomas, Apostle, Saint, 1st centeng
dc.subject.lcshActs of Thomaseng
dc.subject.lcshSaint Thomas Christianseng
dc.subject.lcshChristian literatureeng
dc.titleHusbands scorned and fathers ignored: a social analysis of the Acts of Thomaseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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