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dc.contributor.advisorCallahan, Richard J., 1967-eng
dc.contributor.authorVanLacy, Courtneyeng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 19, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Richard Callahan.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This project reveals a case study in which boundaries are formed around a principle idea through structures, discourse, and theology. Complementarian leaders carefully constructed a community and detailed theology that continually reinforce and legitimize their gender roles. These boundaries unify people with common views about gender roles. Not only does it show how boundaries are formed and maintained but it also gives a clearer understanding of how complementarianism is thriving and prospering within evangelicalism. Gender roles, in past years, were often taken for granted within evangelicalism. After complementarians took over some denominations and seminaries, the idea of spelling out gender roles became important. The complementarian viewpoint has emerged in the last twenty years as a serious conversation for almost every congregation within evangelicalism. They have forced congregations all of over the United States to take a stand one way or the other about gender roles. Before, when gender roles were taken for granted, there were few established doctrines that explicitly defined gender roles. However, once complementarianism became more established, the church denominations, congregations, and seminaries had to decide if they were egalitarian or complementarian. One small group contributed to the changes of many evangelical churches.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiii, 64 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc554748877eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6606eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6606
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshChristianity -- Sex differenceseng
dc.subject.lcshEvangelicalismeng
dc.subject.lcshWomen in the Bibleeng
dc.subject.lcshWomen clergyeng
dc.subject.lcshWomen in Christianityeng
dc.titleThe slippery slope of change : locating the boundaries around complementarian evangelical institutions and ideaseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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