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dc.contributor.advisorLyman, R. Leeeng
dc.contributor.advisorVanPool, Todd L., 1968-eng
dc.contributor.authorGibb, Heather, 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2018eng
dc.date.submitted2018 Springeng
dc.descriptionField of study: Anthropology.eng
dc.descriptionDr. R. Lee Lyman and Dr. Todd VanPool, Dissertation Supervisors.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description"May 2018."eng
dc.description.abstractNumerous zooarchaeological studies have attempted to connect modern conservation issues to evidence of human - animal interactions in the past. By utilizing a geodatabase based on archaeological and paleontological site records gathered from FAUNMAP and the Missouri State Historic Office, a method is developed that allows paleozoological data to be used to assist modern conservation biology through biogeographic range reconstruction and historic landcover associations. This project reconstructs the precontact ranges of four mammalian species: river otter (Lontra canadensis), elk (Cervus elaphus), eastern spotted skunk (Spilogale putorius), and black- and white-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus and Lepus townsendii). The paleozoological presences of these species are compared to the species' modern ranges to provide baseline/benchmark information to wildlife managers and conservation biologists charged with protection and management. Cluster analysis identified clusters of archaeological sites and surveys in Missouri associated with municipalities, federal land (Mark Twain National Forest), and water. By demonstrating the nature of the non-random archaeological survey conducted in Missouri, the presence of the species of interest can be used to reconstruct prehistoric ranges within the context of available data. Elk, river otter and eastern spotted skunk were found across the state in areas where sites with fauna are located. Jackrabbits, although a limited presence, were found in areas that are farther east in Missouri than the modern range for the taxa. Along with range reconstruction, historic vegetation landcover, based on GLO survey data, is used to identify habitat preferences based on the location of sites with fauna of interest.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 100-120).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (vii, 160 pages) : illustrations (some color)eng
dc.identifier.merlinb128722095eng
dc.identifier.oclc1089196111eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/66167
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Licenseeng
dc.titleApplied paleozoology and biogeography : four case studies from Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantor[University of Missouri--Columbia]eng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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