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dc.contributor.advisorMartin, Barbara N. (Barbara Nell), 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorKelley-Hollwell, Victorie Joyce-Ann, 1970-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMiddle Westeng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 17, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Barbara Martin.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.eng
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to add to the knowledge base an understanding of the factors that encouraged or impeded Muslim women wearing hijab from attaining or advancing in positions of leadership in higher education. The researcher viewed the study through the lens of Critical Race Theory. The study population consisted of two Muslim female leaders at a multi-campus community college in the Midwest. Data collection methods included on-site observations, interviews, focus groups and an analysis of campus documents. Informal interviews were conducted with the Muslim female leaders' and their superior and a focus group was conducted with the leaders' colleagues at the campus and assisted in supporting and triangulating the data. The study findings articulated the importance of the role institutions of higher education played in creating environments that endorse inclusion for recruiting, employing, supporting, and promoting aspiring Muslim female leaders; and the importance of relationships or connecting with The Other- between Muslims and non Muslims in breaking down barriers and stereotypes of Muslim women to support recruit, employ, and promote aspiring Muslim female leaders. The results of this inquiry could impact both K-12 institutions and higher education institutions as they address the issue of engaging Muslim students, creating inclusive climates, and hiring Muslim staff, faculty, and administrators.eng
dc.format.extentx, 205 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc557652697eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6617
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6617eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshIslamophobiaeng
dc.subject.lcshHijab (Islamic clothing) -- Case studieseng
dc.subject.lcshMuslim women -- Case studieseng
dc.subject.lcshWomen in education -- Case studieseng
dc.titlePerceptions and behaviors that encourage or impede advancement or attainment of leadership positions in higher education by Muslim women wearing hijabeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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