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dc.contributor.advisorRodgers, Shellyeng
dc.contributor.authorTang, Yueeng
dc.date.issued2018eng
dc.date.submitted2018 Springeng
dc.description.abstractUsing Chipotle E. coli outbreak as context for product-harm crisis, this study examines the nuanced nature of consumer thinking and why consumers adopt coping behaviors or perceptions toward the crisis. The lack of analysis of product-harm crisis communication from the consumer's perspective in existing research is the motivation of this study. Study results highlight the effectiveness of using social media to gain insights into consumer thinking and suggests that public relations practitioners need to consider not just the organization's perspective, but also the consumer's perspective, in developing crisis response strategies. Theoretically, the study contributes to motivations of consumers' coping behaviors or perceptions in product-harm crisis communication. The purpose of referring to a specific case is not a detailed application to "test" or "apply" any theory; rather, the goal is the conceptual identification of unexamined opportunities and challenges involved in existing research and potentially refining the related theory.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/66285
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.title"The food is so good" : why consumers positively cope with product-harm crisiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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