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dc.contributor.advisorKallenbach, Robert L.eng
dc.contributor.authorHoux, James H., 1970-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Robert L. Kallenbach.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Agronomy.eng
dc.description.abstractSilvopasture offers Midwest landowners the opportunity to plant trees in their pastures without significant loss of forage production. However, much of the pasture in the Midwest is dominated by tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub.). Researchers are unsure why, but tall fescue is known to inhibit tree growth. It may be competition for moisture and nutrients, or possibly allelopathy. To improve the adoption of silvopasture, this research was conducted to delineate factors that may affect tall fescue's competitiveness and to create recommendations that minimize the effects of these factors on tree growth. Black walnut, red oak, and black locust growth was reduced up to 90 % when grown with grass competition compared to that in vegetation-free controls, while pitch x loblolly pine growth was similar in grasses and in vegetation-free plots. Neither dry matter yield of grasses nor tall fescue's endophyte association affected tree growth. Results suggest that weed control should extend a minimum of 1.21 m from black walnut seedlings in tall fescue pastures to maximize height and diameter growth. bare-root and containerized seedlings transplanted well and were larger than seeded seedlings after two years in the field. Producers wishing to plant improved black walnut varieties may be limited to containerized stock because improved bare-root seedlings are not often available. Mycorrhizae inoculants had no effect on the establishment of any stock type.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 105 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc551798921eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6631
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6631eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshSilvopastoral systemseng
dc.subject.lcshTall fescueeng
dc.subject.lcshEastern black walnuteng
dc.titleRecommendations for tree establishment in tall fescue-based silvopastureeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAgronomy (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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