[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSemlitsch, Raymond D.eng
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Bethany K., 1980-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Raymond D. Semlitsch.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractModification of landscapes for agricultural production can introduce agrochemicals into surface waters and degrade aquatic habitats used by many amphibians for breeding and larval development. Although many ecotoxicological studies have shown that contaminants common in agricultural runoff have the potential to cause mortality, immunosuppression, or reproductive abnormalities in amphibians, we have a very poor understanding of how exposure to agricultural runoff may affect amphibian population persistence when exposures occur in realistic contexts. Using laboratory studies, field studies, and landscape level surveys, I established that herbicides common in runoff can cause mortality and alter life history traits in amphibian larvae under laboratory conditions at levels as low as EPA drinking water standards, although laboratory exposures to water from agricultural streams generally enhanced larval performance. In field enclosure studies, tadpole performance in agricultural streams showed more year-to-year variability than in reference condition streams. Landscape level surveys confirmed that the majority of anurans present in the study area use streams for both calling activity and reproduction. Physical stream habitat characteristics were better predictors of capture rates than local or watershed land use, indicating that habitat availability may be an important constraint on amphibian success at stream sites.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 140 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc537194396eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6641
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6641eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshAnura -- Effect of water pollution oneng
dc.subject.lcshTadpoles -- Effect of water pollution oneng
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural pollutioneng
dc.titleA multi-scale investigation of ecologically relevant effects of agricultural runoff on amphibianseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record