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dc.contributor.advisorTriplett, Gregory Edward, 1973-eng
dc.contributor.authorIkpe, Stanley A., 1985-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 10, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Gregory E. Triplett Jr.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Electrical engineering.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] High-bandwidth optical communication systems are increasingly in demand. As radio frequency (RF) telecommunications approach its natural limit in bandwidth efficiency and long distance transmission, novel optical telecommunication techniques such as Free Space Optics (FSO) provide a viable solution for rapid, long distance data transmission. FSO is an optical technique that uses free space as the core transmission medium. A recent trend in FSO implementation shows the laser source is typically in the near-infrared (NIR) or mid-infrared (MIR) range since infrared radiation is less affected by atmospheric interferences. This allows for very high speed data transmission speeds (on the order of Gb/s) and high bandwidth with minimal atmospheric scattering and absorption, hence more efficient transmission. FSO systems are essentially limited by the responsivity of the photodetector, many of which are not able to detect very high frequency signals at long wavelength. In this thesis, the atmospheric effects on a FSO system using NIR radiation (980 nm, 1.320 [lowercase mu]m, and 1.550 [lowercase mu]m) is analyzed and are evaluated under various atmospheric conditions.eng
dc.format.extentxi, 106 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc558840932eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6654
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6654eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2009 UM restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshFree space optical interconnectseng
dc.subject.lcshLaser communication systemseng
dc.subject.lcshLaser beams -- Atmospheric effectseng
dc.titleAtmospheric effects on near-infrared free space optical communication linkseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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