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dc.contributor.advisorLooser, Devoney, 1967-eng
dc.contributor.authorLake, Crystal B.eng
dc.coverage.spatialGreat Britaineng
dc.coverage.temporal1700-1799eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 25, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Devoney Looser.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] "Ruin Nation: Antiquarian Objects and Political Narratives in the Long Eighteenth Century" examines representations of architectural ruins and archaeological artifacts in Britain between the end of the Early Modern period and the beginning of the Romantic period. I argue that antiquarianism - the examination, documentation, and collection of historical objects and ruined architecture - was far more ubiquitous in eighteenth-century British culture than scholars have traditionally assumed. Likewise, I draw into question the prevalent scholarly assumption that eighteenth-century antiquarianism was a patriotic pastime that buttressed the nationalist ideologies of the British Empire. By examining the representations of antiquarian methodologies and objects in literary, visual, and popular texts, this dissertation uncovers the political narratives that coalesced around the ruins of the past. Antiquarianism provided surprising opportunities to question the historical and contemporary ideologies of the British nation, and the examination of ruined sites and objects occasioned reflection on the decline and fall of historical nations (such as the Roman Empire) and the tenuous nature of the contemporary state. In other words, I argue that ruined objects engendered discourses on individual and national forms of ruin, and provided opportunities to question, critique, and in some cases, outright reject the political conventions and social practices of the long eighteenth century.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.description.tableofcontents"The most vocal of monuments:" numismatics, the novel of circulation, and the ruin of the nation -- Ruined women: antiquarian architecture and feminism in Sarah Scott's Millenium Hall -- "The manuscripts flew about like butterflies:" the politics of manuscript recovery and the castle of Otranto -- "A dead weight on the loins of national improvement:" The ruinous pleasures and politics of neoclassicism.eng
dc.format.extentii, 258 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc566066995eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6694
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6694eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshArchaeology and literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshAntiquarianseng
dc.subject.lcshRuins in literatureeng
dc.titleRuin nation : antiquarian objects and political narratives in the long eighteenth centuryeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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