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dc.contributor.advisorRenz, David O. (David Owen)
dc.contributor.authorBeem, Matthew J.
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018 Fall
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page viewed February 12, 2019
dc.descriptionDissertation Advisor: David O. Renz
dc.descriptionVita
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 78-83)
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Bloch School of Management and School of Education. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2018
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the preference for and prevalence of performance-based compensation and the relationship between it and productivity within the sample population of professional fundraisers. It reviews the history of fundraiser compensation and prevalence of incentive pay in the nonprofit sector and among professional fundraisers, including its correlation to performance. The study’s first hypothesis posits that a majority of fundraisers whose compensation includes an at-risk component prefer financial rewards over non financial rewards, while a majority of fundraisers whose compensation does not include an at-risk component prefer non-financial rewards over financial rewards. The second hypothesis holds that fundraisers who work for higher education, health care and arts organizations prefer financial over non-financial rewards, while fundraisers who work for religious, social service and environmental organizations prefer non-financial over financial rewards. The third hypotheses asserts that the compensation plans of male fundraisers are different than the compensation plans of female fundraisers. The study tests the first two hypotheses with multiple regression analysis and the third with an independent sample t-test. Hypothesis tests rejected the first null hypothesis but failed to reject the second and third null hypotheses. Findings revealed respondents’ dissatisfaction with the relationship between goal attainment, performance and compensation in their jobs. It also found significant compensation differences based on respondents’ gender and ethnicity, findings different from research discussed in the literature review. My research also confirmed that the age, educational attainment and other descriptive characteristics of the sample population are similar to those reported in research discussed in the literature review. This dissertation adds important knowledge about the prevalence of and desire for performance-based compensation within the sample population and what effect performance-based compensation has on the amount of money fundraisers raise.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Literature review -- Methodology -- Resutts -- Analysis --References -- Appendix A. Survey solicitation email and informed consent -- Appendix B. Follow-up survey email 1 -- Appendix C.Follow-up survey email 2 -- Appendix D. Fundraiser compensation survey
dc.format.extentx, 98 pages
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/67025
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri -- Kansas Cityeng
dc.subject.lcshFund raisers (Persons) -- Salaries, etc.
dc.subject.lcshAssociation of Fundraising Professionals
dc.subject.lcshNonprofit organizations -- Salaries, etc.
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Public administration.
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Education
dc.titlePerformance-Based Fundraiser Compensation: An Analysis of Preference, Prevalence and Effecteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Affairs and Administration (UMKC)
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership, Policy and Foundations (UMKC)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas City
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.namePh.D.


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