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dc.contributor.advisorFoulkes, Matthew Walton, 1971-eng
dc.contributor.authorTreece, James Paul Wangeng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Saint Louiseng
dc.coverage.spatialLouisiana -- New Orleanseng
dc.coverage.spatialCalifornia -- Los Angeleseng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Matthew Foulkes.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Geography.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Payday lending is a topic of much controversy. Issuing short term loans to high risk borrowers, payday lenders often charge interest rates in excess of 400% APR. Many consumer advocates and researchers have argued that payday lenders are predatory, and primarily locate in low income and minority neighborhoods, while payday lenders argue that they provide an essential credit service to a financially limited population. Previous researchers have analyzed the industry based on the location of payday lending branches, assuming that borrowers reside near their stores. Utilizing a unique database of former borrower residential addresses from one company, this research addresses the question of where borrowers actually reside in relation to the stores they borrow from, and what are the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the neighborhoods where they reside. The former borrower addressees were mapped and analyzed for patterns in borrower distribution, distance to stores, and demographics in St. Louis, MO; New Orleans, LA; and Los Angeles, CA. The results of the spatial analysis indicated that borrowers tend to live near the stores they borrow from, while the socioeconomic analysis indicated that borrowers often reside in neighborhoods that are less affluent and contain a higher proportion of African Americans than store neighborhoods. Both borrower and store neighborhoods are much less affluent and more racially diverse than the metropolitan areas.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 68 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc568700798eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6714
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6714eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2009 UM restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshStore locationeng
dc.subject.lcshPayday loanseng
dc.subject.lcshPayday loanseng
dc.subject.lcshPayday loanseng
dc.subject.lcshWorking class -- Economic conditionseng
dc.titlePayday lending: spatial distribution and neighborhood demographicseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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