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dc.contributor.advisorBardone-Cone, Annaeng
dc.contributor.authorHarney, Megan B.eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 19, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Anna Bardone-Cone.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This longitudinal study investigates under what conditions overvaluation of weight/shape is related to bulimic symptoms. In this study we examine whether internal attribution for negative appearance-related events moderates the relation between over-valuation of weight/shape and bulimic symptoms. Next, we examine whether this interaction is mediated by self-competence. Self-report questionnaires of overvaluation of weight/shape, internal attribution, self-competence, and bulimic symptoms were administered to 406 female undergraduates, with overvaluation of weight/shape being reported at Time 1, self-competence and bulimic symptoms being reported at Time 2, and internal attribution for negative appearance-related events data collected across the 11 intervening weeks between Time 1 and Time 2. Regression analyses revealed a significant, two-way interaction whereby high overvaluation of weight/shape was associated with the presence of binges (but not inappropriate compensatory behaviors or bulimic symptoms in general). In addition, a significant two-way interaction was found between overvaluation and internal attribution to predict self-competence. However, the full mediated moderation model was not significant. The findings highlight the importance of overvaluation of weight/shape in relation to bingeing (particularly for those high in internal attribution) and feeling efficacious (regardless of attribution level).eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 52 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc560567984eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6719eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6719
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshBulimiaeng
dc.subject.lcshBody image in womeneng
dc.subject.lcshObesity in womeneng
dc.subject.lcshCollege students -- Psychologyeng
dc.titleA mediated moderation model of bulimic symptoms among college womeneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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