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dc.contributor.advisorCalvin, James H. (James Halvorsen), 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorLeon Zamuco, Eric deeng
dc.coverage.temporal2000-2099eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Professor James H. Calvin.eng
dc.descriptionM.F.A. University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This creative research is about filtering my own displaced experience, of being part of the Filipino Diaspora. With Judeo-Christian spirituality as my lens I have created artworks that deal with the unfamiliar aspects of America. The notion of making an object as a symbol, as an expression of faith, or as a reminder of a spiritual lesson from a specific circumstance was a ritual that was done all over the world for thousands of years. For instance, Old Testament Scriptures record Jewish exiles, upon arrival at their destination collected ordinary stones, and stacked them up as an offering and as an act of remembering. My pieces are in resonance with these "memorial stones." My artworks run the gamut of subject matter from identity, notions about home, post-colonial narratives, religious consumerism to a seemingly simple a topic as the season of winter. This investigation took the form of installations, objects and video performances suggesting that every personal circumstance has underlying spiritual implications. I positioned myself both as a social commentator and as a supplicant. These points of view are exemplified by how American society is critiqued and how the process of making has allowed myself to become aware of my own contradictions and spiritual malpractices. The object lessons from banal materiality engage both the maker and viewer to reflect on the significance of spirituality. My intent is to find collective truths, which go beyond cultural differences. These truths result in knowledge for transcendence to a truly human order.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentv, 64 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc568687118eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6722eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6722
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshLeon Zamuco, Eric de -- Criticism and interpretationeng
dc.subject.lcshFilipino American artistseng
dc.subject.lcshChristianity and arteng
dc.subject.lcshJudaism and arteng
dc.subject.lcshArt, Moderneng
dc.titleBanal : sculptural meditations on the unfamiliareng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.F.A.eng


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