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dc.contributor.advisorDesRosiers, Nathanieleng
dc.contributor.authorMeetz, Johanna Kathleeneng
dc.coverage.temporal30-600eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 23, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Nathaniel DesRosiers.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The Rules of Truth found in the works of Irenaeus (c. 180-200 CE) and Tertullian (c. 203-210 CE) and the doctrine contained in the Nicene Creed (325 CE) are remarkably similar though the Rule and the Creed were composed over 100 years apart and in different locations throughout the Roman Empire. The Rule and the Creed each emphasize that there is one creator God, that Jesus is the son of God who was born of a virgin, that the events of Jesus' life as well as his death, resurrection, and future re-appearance to judge humanity took place, and that the Holy Spirit exists. These commonalities are too significant to dismiss as merely coincidence. Instead, they can be explained by the kerygma, which, despite the diversity of early Christianity, was a unifying presence over time and geography. In order to demonstrate the influence of the kerygma, I will trace its presence through Paul, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Tertullian, and the Nicene Creed. Furthermore, it is the inherent flexibility of the kerygma allowed early Christians to emphasize certain parts of it in order to most effectively combat the various threats to the Church at the time each Rule or Creed was composed. As time went by and the needs of the church changed, the kerygma was captured in increasingly prescriptive, unchanging forms. As such, the Rules of Irenaeus and Tertullian are more rigid than the formulaic doctrinal statements found in Paul and Justin, while the Nicene Creed represents the most rigid, formal, and universal adaptation of the kerygma the Church had yet produced.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiv, 80 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc567642967eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6726eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6726
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshPaul, the Apostle, Sainteng
dc.subject.lcshJustin, Martyr, Sainteng
dc.subject.lcshIrenaeus, Saint, Bishop of Lyoneng
dc.subject.lcshTertullian, ca. 160-ca. 230eng
dc.subject.lcshNicene Creedeng
dc.subject.lcshPreaching -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshChurch historyeng
dc.titleGuarding the preaching and the faith : kerygma and the rule of the truth from Paul to the Nicene creedeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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