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dc.contributor.advisorHackley, Steven Alleneng
dc.contributor.authorHebert, Karen Reneeeng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 19, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Steven A. Hackley.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri-Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This thesis extends previous work examining the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on cognitive functioning by explicitly testing a prominent model (Frank, 2006). In study one, a procedural learning task involving probabilistic classifications was utilized to explore the contributions of the STN to reward learning and motor planning. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from elderly controls (N=16) and patients (N=9) "on" and "off" stimulation. Stimulation was found to speed responses but at the cost of greatly reduced accuracy. Psychophysiological measures indicate an impaired ability to update working memory and use reward related feedback to drive learning during stimulation. In contrast, motor and pre-motor activation improved during DBS. In study two, parallel rule based and information integration tasks were used to examine if DBS impairs accurate response selection thru insufficient time for integration. Mean level analysis of accuracy and reaction time (RT) data collected from elderly controls (N=18) and patients (N=12), indicated that STN stimulation speeded responses at a cost of decreased accuracy. Trial based analysis, however, indicated that RT changes were consistent across the distribution, and that attentional and cognitive flexibility deficits contributed to performance impairments. Therefore, early responding was not responsible for the poor accuracy seen during DBS. In contrast to the prominent Frank (2006) theory, these findings suggest that the motor and cognitive effects of DBS are dissociable and occur thru separate cortico-basal gangliar loopseng
dc.format.extentvi, 113 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc560599765eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6727
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6727eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2009 MU restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2009 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshParkinson's diseaseeng
dc.subject.lcshBrain stimulationeng
dc.subject.lcshImplicit learningeng
dc.subject.lcshSubthalamuseng
dc.titleEffects of deep brain stimulation on implicit learning in patients with Parkinson's diseaseeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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