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dc.contributor.advisorWigger, John H., 1959-eng
dc.contributor.authorFlint, Brandoneng
dc.date.issued2017eng
dc.date.submitted2017 Falleng
dc.descriptionAbstract from public.pdf.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] While short-term missions attracted a small number of participants in the early years of the movement, since the mid-twentieth century the practice has grown at an increasing rate. While only a few hundred participated in the 1950s, by 2010 more than a million Americans joined each year. Despite that growth, historians have ignored this change in the practice and idea of missions. Short-term missionaries democratized american missions, shifted control away from denominational hierarchy, shaped the lived religion of modern evangelicalism, and globalized American religious practice. Short-term missions also reflect the unique cultural milieu that created them as they were shaped by new youth culture, anticommunism, and technological developments.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes biblographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentiv, 268 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/67522
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10-32469/10355/67522eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess to files is limited to the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.titleSpring break for Jesus : the rise of Protestant short-term missions, 1950-1980eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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