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dc.contributor.advisorIslam, Naz E.eng
dc.contributor.authorCamps Raga, Bruno F., 1976-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 11, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Naz E. Islameng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia, 2009.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This thesis presents a method to analyze a series of structures, referred to as fractals, that radiate electromagnetic waves. The fractal series are components of the so-called "Minkowski island", and the patterns are generated, through successive iterations, from a square patch, usually referred to as the initiator or pre-fractal. Simulation software was specifically developed for the characterization of these structures and also to create the specific geometries used in the study. Another computer tool was implemented to construct the same structures in such a way that they would meet the input format requirements of a commercially available simulation suite since it was not easy to create complex fractal geometries using the graphic interface of the commercial software. This is also an essential tool to efficiently study the impact of variations in geometrical parameters in the radiation properties. Previous analyses show that fractal structures can be employed as either stand alone radiators or elements of antenna arrays for any specific application. Results obtained through this research compare very well with those from the industry standard software, and thus the simulation tool that has been designed in his research project is validated as an accurate procedure to study fractal patch antennas. The results presented involve the return loss parameter obtained at frequencies ranging from DC to 20 GHz for a pre-fractal patch as well as for the first two iterations of the "Minkowski island" fractal derived from it. The patterns show some resonances that are shifted down in frequency (as well as a trend towards wideband operation) as the number of iterations increase, a fact that agrees with previous studies for fractal elements and allows for antenna miniaturization.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxi, 115 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc514059837eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6781eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6781
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshFractalseng
dc.subject.lcshMinkowski geometryeng
dc.subject.lcshElectromagnetic waveseng
dc.subject.lcshAntenna radiation patternseng
dc.subject.lcshAntenna arrayseng
dc.titleSimulation algorithms for fractal radiationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and computer engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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