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dc.contributor.advisorLin, Mengshieng
dc.contributor.authorHe, Lili, 1982-eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 23, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Mengshi Lin.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Food science.eng
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, food safety issues caused by contamination of chemical substances or microbial species have raised a great deal of concern in the United States. Conventional chromatography-based methods for detection of chemical contaminants and microbial plating methods for detection of food-borne pathogens are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this project, we explored the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) coupled with a variety of substrates (e.g. commercial gold substrates, fractal-like gold nanoaggregates, silver dendrites, and gold-coated zinc oxide nanonecklaces) for detection of various chemical and microbiological food contaminants, including melamine and its analogues, restricted antibiotics and prohibited dyes, and Bacillus spores. Our results demonstrate that SERS is capable of detecting, characterizing, and differentiating chemical and microbiological contaminants in foods quickly and accurately. The limit of detection of SERS could reach a single spore or parts per billion level for chemical samples. These results indicate a great potential of using SERS techniques for rapid detection, classification, and quantification of chemical and biochemical contaminants in food products.eng
dc.format.extentxiii, 130 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc605876040eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6859
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6859eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshFood contamination -- Measurementeng
dc.subject.lcshRaman spectroscopyeng
dc.subject.lcshRaman effect, Surface enhancedeng
dc.titleApplication of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to food safety issueseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFood science (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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