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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, A. Markeng
dc.contributor.authorMcRae, Heather Thorntoneng
dc.date.issued2018eng
dc.date.submitted2018 Springeng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the physiognomy of Albertus Magnus, which is contained within his commentary on De animalibus, the three works on animals by Aristotle. This physiognomy provides an opportunity to demonstrate the medieval intellectual world view that the body and soul were connected, both theologically and medically. Albertus Magnus and his physiognomy also exemplify the reintroduction of physiognomy into Latin Christendom in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries through deep textual connections in physiognomy, medicine, and theories of the soul to the classical Mediterranean through the intermediary of the Islamic world. Physiognomies like that of Albertus Magnus also contribute to ideas of what constitutes a medieval scientia by building upon past scholarship on astrology, hagiography, and other aspects of the premodern world that have largely been rejected until recent decades.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentv, 224 pages : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/68922
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Licenseeng
dc.titlePointing to inclinations : Albertus Magnus' physiognomy as a scientific and theological nexuseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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