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dc.contributor.authorFrisvold, George B.eng
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Terrance M.eng
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Paul D. (Paul David)eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.description.abstractWeeds, along with insect pests and plant diseases, are sources of biotic stress in crop systems that reduce yields, raise production costs, and contribute to income risk to farmers (HarvestChoice, 2009). Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crop varieties, first introduced in 1996, offer the promise of more effective weed control. By 2008, more than 79 million hectares worldwide were planted to HR varieties of soybean, maize, canola, cotton, alfalfa, and sugar beets (James, 2009). What accounts for the rapid diffusion of HR crops in countries where they have gained regulatory approval? Research suggests grower adoption decisions depend not only on farm profits, but also on the complex characteristics of herbicides and weed-management programs, such as simplicity, convenience, flexibility, and safety. HR crops, thus, may provide multiple pecuniary and non-pecuniary benefits, including environmental benefits.eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 12(3&4) 2009: 244-248.eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/6925eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum vol.12, no.3 & 4 (2009)eng
dc.source.urihttp://www.agbioforum.missouri.edu/v12n34/v12n34a00-frisvold.htmeng
dc.subjectbiotic stresseng
dc.subjectcrop systemseng
dc.subjectweed controleng
dc.subject.lcshHerbicide-resistant cropseng
dc.subject.lcshWeeds -- Controleng
dc.subject.lcshPlants -- Disease and pest resistance -- Researcheng
dc.titleOverview: Herbicide Resistant Crops—Diffusion, Benefits, Pricing, and Resistance Managementeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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