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dc.contributor.advisorNelson, Kelly Allaneng
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Renee Laureneng
dc.date.issued2018eng
dc.date.submitted2018 Falleng
dc.description.abstract"There is an increasing emphasis on management strategies such as reduced tillage, use of cover crops, and implementation of conservation practices (i.e. terraces, no-till, and cropping systems) in Missouri cropping systems. By combining best management practices for conservation, soil health could be improved, and farmers could obtain higher yields and economic returns. Soil health is the capacity of a soil to function for plant, animal, and microbial sustainability evaluated by set parameters and evaluated over time. A "best management practice" refers to economically-viable practices that prevent or reduce pollution generated by non-point sources (Centner et al., 1996). Field research is needed to devise optimal combinations of these management practices for farmers, while balancing them with the economic realities of crop production." -- Introductioneng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 178 pages : illustrationeng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/70734
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.titleIntegrating cover crops into crop rotations in upstate Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, insect and microbial sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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