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dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Vicki J.eng
dc.contributor.authorPavlick, Donna L.eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDr. Vicki J. Rosser, Dissertation Supervisor.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstractBased on Tinto's (1993) theory of student departure, this dissertation presents the findings of original research into the factors that influenced the baccalaureate degree attainment of a group of African American Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) students. Several members of this group of participants were surveyed and interviewed to determine why they, unlike many other traditional-aged African American students at predominantly white colleges and universities, persisted to baccalaureate degree attainment. The survey and interview questions used in this study were constructed using factors that Tinto (1993) and other researchers identified as influencing persistence. The research results indicated that these participants attributed their enrollment and persistence to degree attainment primarily to the encouragement and support of their parents. The influence provided by faculty as parental surrogates was a secondary source of encouragement. The results of this study support the prior research regarding the important role parents and faculty play in academic engagement and degree attainment but draw into question the benefits of peer interaction and institutional behaviors on baccalaureate degree attainment for these African American students..eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 151 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc608744921eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/7109
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/7109eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshCouncil on Legal Education Opportunity (U.S.)eng
dc.subject.lcshBachelor of arts degreeeng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American college studentseng
dc.subject.lcshEducation, Higher -- Parent participationeng
dc.titleA study of why a select group of African American students persisted to baccalaureate attainmenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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