[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLikos, William J.eng
dc.contributor.authorWayllace, Alexandraeng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 2, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDr. William Likos, Thesis Supervisor.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstractA significant amount of research has been carried out to characterize expansive clay behavior from either microstructural or macrostructural perspectives; however, there exists a current gap in our knowledge about the basic mechanisms that relate one structural level to another. This research investigates: how volume changes occurring on the interlayer scale upscale to volume change and swelling pressure for bulk particle systems, how variables such as void ratio, compaction conditions, particle and pore fabric, confining conditions, initial conditions, pore fluid chemistry, and clay chemistry govern this upscaling process, and what models are available to quantify these effects. Three types of clay were used: Na-smectite, Ca-smectite, and a Ca-exchanged form of the Na-smectite. Results obtained include: SEM imaging of Na and Ca smectite, void ratio vs. compaction pressure, water vapor sorption isotherms, axial deformation vs. relative humidity (RH) for free swell boundary conditions, and swelling pressure vs. RH for constant strain boundary conditions. Effects of initial density, interlayer cation, clay fabric, and stress paths were qualitatively analyzed in light of three conceptual models, and quantified by defining constitutive surfaces for smectite for crystalline swelling. With better knowledge of how microstructural swelling translates to macroscopic behavior, the geotechnical engineering community and industry will be more equipped to approach and resolve the several problems involving expansive clays. .eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxiv,136 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc609645250eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/7110
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/7110eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshClay soilseng
dc.subject.lcshSoil-structure interactioneng
dc.subject.lcshEngineering geologyeng
dc.subject.lcshSmectiteeng
dc.titleVolume change and swelling pressure of expansive clay in the crystalline swelling regimeeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record