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dc.contributor.advisorKeller, S. W. (Steven W.)eng
dc.contributor.authorMagee, Chad Leroy, 1973-eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 23, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDr. Steven W. Keller, Dissertation Supervisor.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstractHeavy metals in the environment such as Cd, Hg and Pb are toxic to life forms. They can enter the ecological system through both natural and industrial sources. By developing chemical sensors that can detect these metals, scientists can identify problem areas and assist in the removal of the hazardous materials. Although sensors have been developed that can measure using one experimental method, the quest goes on to find sensors that have multiple routes to detection when a particular metal species becomes bound. Ferrocene derivatives hold promise as a possible route to a multiple detector ion sensor. By changing the functional groups on the ferrocene derivative, the selectivity of the ligand system can be modified towards a particular metal cation. One reported and two unreported 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene systems have been tested with eight metals and their complexes characterized as a means to develop a spectroscopic database. The information can be used to determine the products formed during the selectivity experiments with each system. During this research project, one system was found to be very selective for chelating Hg2+in the presence of other commonly found metal cations and could be detected from other complexes in the database through three means: proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). While a working universal heavy metal sensor was not achieved during this research project, it advanced the progress towards the formation of one.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentxix, 361 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc608737520eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/7117eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/7117
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshChemical detectorseng
dc.subject.lcshFerroceneeng
dc.subject.lcshCadmium -- Toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshMercury -- Toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshLead -- Toxicologyeng
dc.subject.lcshSchiff baseseng
dc.titleThe synthesis and characterization of 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene imine Schiff base ligand systems for use as potential environmental heavy metal cationic sensorseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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