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dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Vicki J.eng
dc.contributor.authorMamiseishvili, Ketevan, 1976-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on February 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Vicki J. Rosser.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The study examined what differences existed between international and U.S. citizen faculty members' productivity and job satisfaction and how each group's productivity in the areas of graduate and undergraduate teaching, research, and service related to their job satisfaction. Utilizing the data from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) data set, the researcher used a Two-Group Structural Equation Model (SEM) to address the primary research questions in the study. The results indicated that international faculty members were significantly more productive in research, but less productive in service and undergraduate teaching than their U.S citizen counterparts. The findings also suggested that increased undergraduate teaching productivity was significantly and negatively related to job satisfaction across both international and citizen faculty samples. The study has important policy implications. First, a more inclusive and supportive policy environment is needed to recognize the academic advantages and contributions of international faculty members in all functions of their work and not just in research. Second, higher education institutions need to rethink their reward structures, value systems, and expectations placed on faculty work in order to keep highly productive faculty more satisfied with their jobs, and thus provide them with the academic workplace that is more appealing and attractive.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 116 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc610041690eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/7188
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/7188eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshEducational productivityeng
dc.subject.lcshTeachers -- Workloadeng
dc.subject.lcshEducation -- Researcheng
dc.subject.lcshInternational schools -- Faculty -- Job satisfactioneng
dc.subject.lcshUniversities and colleges -- Faculty -- Job satisfactioneng
dc.subject.lcshEducational exchangeseng
dc.titleInternational and citizen faculty in the United States : an examination of their productivity and job satisfactioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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