[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRymph, Catherine E.eng
dc.contributor.authorStockwell, Ryan J.eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.temporal1900-1999eng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.date.submitted2008 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on February 24, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Catherine Rymph.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2008.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the particular path of technological change after World War II, how farm people adjusted to that change in their work and identity, as well as the policy implications of the numerous ramifications of the 20th century farm technology revolution. The rapid farm population decline that began with World War II continued to the end of the 20th century. This farm population loss combined with growing commodity surpluses, a Cold War atmosphere, and the transformation of farms into modern businesses to create tensions within federal farm policy that had for decades pursued the unified goals of improved farm living, increased production and technological adoption. "The farm problem," as it became known, highlighted the popular concern that farming was changing too quickly and would result in the extinction of the family farm, an ideal based on the agrarian myth but shaped by modern concerns of the growth of corporate farming and the international presence of collective farming in the Soviet Union. Under such conditions, tensions arose within farm policy between the older values and new concerns for the continuation of the family farm. These tensions often resulted in jumbled and contradictory federal farm policy that failed to stem the loss of smaller farms or the implementation of more technology.eng
dc.format.extentiv, 351 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc609907404eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/7196
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/7196eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshCollectivization of agricultureeng
dc.subject.lcshFamily farms -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshIndustrialization -- Historyeng
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture and stateeng
dc.titleThe family farm in the post-World War II era: industrialization, the cold war and political symboleng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record