[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLyne, Mona M., 1960-
dc.contributor.authorSteed, Brian L.
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2020 Spring
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page viewed June 10, 2020
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Mona Lyne
dc.descriptionVita
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 200-225)
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Department on Political Science and Department of History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2020
dc.description.abstractConflicts exist within a narrative about a society, a government, and the people’s place within it that they use to make sense of their world. Since 1945, conventionally weaker military actors have had increasing success against stronger actors by exploiting dissonance in that narrative to incrementally displace existing governing structures and establish control. This strategy takes time as the weaker actor employs a strategy of exhaustion that drains the will and resources of the stronger actor. This dissertation demonstrates this theory through three case studies: Hezbollah against Israel (1982-2000 and 2006), the Taliban against the United States (2001-present), and the Islamic State (ISIS) against Iraq and the United States-led coalition (2014-present). Each case presents a different way a weaker actor accomplished disruption, displacement, and exhaustion.
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Literature review -- The argument -- Case study: Hezbollah -- Case Study: Taliban -- Case study: Islamic State in Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) -- Conclusion -- Appendix. Story coding
dc.format.extentviii, 226 pages
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/74002
dc.subject.lcshNon-state actors (International relations)
dc.subject.lcshIS (Organization) -- Public relations
dc.subject.lcshHizballah (Lebanon) -- Public relations
dc.subject.lcshTaliban -- Public relations
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Political science
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- History
dc.titleNarrative as a Critical Component for Violent Weaker Actor Success
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Science (UMKC)
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (UMKC)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas City
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.namePh.D. (Doctor of Philosophy)


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record