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dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Musiceng
dc.contributor.otherStoltzman, Richardeng
dc.contributor.otherDouglas, Billeng
dc.contributor.otherBudds, Michaeleng
dc.date.issued1985eng
dc.descriptionNotes by Michael Budds.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes insert: "A Mid America Arts Alliance Program." This performance is made possible by support from your state arts agency and the National Endowment for the Arts, through their participation in Mid-American Arts Alliance, a regional arts organization. M-AAA also gratefully acknowledges the support of the corporations and foundations listed on the other side.eng
dc.descriptionAt head of title: UMC Concert Series proudly presentseng
dc.description.abstract"In the family of musical instruments the clarinet is a relatively youthful member. It is descended from the single-reed shawm, the chalumeau, and in its initial, early eighteenth-century form was similar in tone quality to its cousin, the oboe. Largely due to modifications in its reed, the clarinet established its true identity by the mid-1700s, when it was accepted into the orchestra by progressive composers such as Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Stamitz, and Francois Joseph Gossec. It has been assumed that Mozart first heard the wind instrument he was to favor above all others in London in 1764. Once accepted and refined, the clarinet has proved to be one of the more versatile instruments that Western musicians have had at their disposal. By now there is a long tradition of composers' employing it to add warmth or brilliance to their chamber and orchestral scores. In the early years of the twentieth century, Afro-American musicians adopted the clarinet as a distinctive voice for dixieland jazz combos, in which it was used to provide a layer of harmonic filigree to the busy texture. And, just as important, the clarinet has been and continues to be the "work-horse" of the wind band. Surely its general popularity in modern times is closely related to the peculiar fact that the clarinet is, in a sense, three instruments in one. The clarinet can produce three distinctive timbres, each associated with a different register: the lush, silky low register be-low the break (the chalumeau); the trumpet-like, crystalline middle register above the break (the clarion or clarino); and the bright, somewhat brittle upper register (the altissimo). Like singers, clarinetists strive to produce a consistency and evenness of sound throughout the range of possible pitches, but the variety of timbral possibilities does tend to set the clarinet apart. Indeed, it gives the clarinet much of its colorful personality. ..."--Program notes.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsProgram: La Fille au cheveux de lin (transcription) ; Araesque II (transcription) / Claude Debussy -- Quatuor pour la Fin du Temps / Olivier Messiaen -- Two-Part Inventions for Clarient & Basson [transcriptions] / J.S. Bach -- Miniatures / Bill Douglas -- Entrata No. 2 / William Thomas McKinley -- Drei Romanzen, Op. 94 / Robert Schumann -- Sonata for Clarinet & Piano (1962).eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIncludes: Richard Stoltzman and Bill Douglas, Biographies ; Program Notes by Michael Budds ; Upcoming Eventseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/76943
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Musiceng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Missouri--Columbia concert series ; 1984-1985eng
dc.sourceDigitized by MU Libraries, 2020. Copy loaned from School of Music.eng
dc.titleChamber music series performance of Richard Stoltzman, clarinet, Bill Douglas, bassoon & piano ... Thursday, January 24, 1985eng
dc.title.alternativeFirst National Bank Chamber music series performance of Richard Stoltzman, clarinet, Bill Douglas, bassoon & piano ... Thursday, January 24, 1985eng
dc.typeConcert programseng


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