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dc.contributor.advisorGreitens, Sheena Chestnuteng
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Laron K.eng
dc.contributor.authorLee, Myungheeeng
dc.date.issued2020eng
dc.date.submitted2020 Springeng
dc.description.abstractHow does an authoritarian successor party (ASP) interact with civil society in East and Southeast Asia? Does an ASP's control over the executive and legislature increase or decrease protest movements? Do ASPs effectively mobilize protesters? Why do ASP supporters organize protests? Among third wave democracies from 1974 to 2010, 75 percent of countries produced authoritarian successor parties and 54 percent of them had ASPs returned to power. In Asia, in particular, many ASPs still remain successful in elections. By employing various research methods ranging from frequentist and Bayesian to qualitative analysis of interviews, this study examines the relationship between ASPs and civil society organizations (CSOs) in Asia and provides an answer to each question.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (vii, 138 pages) ; Illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/78081
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Copyright held by author.
dc.subject.otherPolitical scienceeng
dc.titleAuthoritarian successor parties and political protest in Asiaeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical science (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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