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dc.contributor.advisorGeary, David C.eng
dc.contributor.authorLaMendola, Josepheng
dc.date.issued2020eng
dc.date.submitted2020 Summereng
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about what mechanisms allow some individuals more than others to flexibly develop cognitive competencies and behavioral biases while growing up to better meet the demands of their ecology, a phenomenon known as developmental plasticity. Since many traits are found to be more variable in men than women and because men tend to exhibit greater developmental plasticity than women, Del Giudice et al. (2018) proposed that early androgen exposure may moderate developmental plasticity in both sexes in traits that vary more in men. The associated hypothesis that higher perinatal androgen exposure will enhance responsivity to the environment was tested. Using digit ratio (a well-known measure of perinatal androgen exposure) to predict how strongly early spatial experiences impacted the development of adult spatial ability and sensory processing sensitivity, four separate tests failed to support the hypothesis. Limitations of the tests are discussed.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (v, 55 pages) ; illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/78628
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. Copyright held by author.
dc.subject.disciplinePsychologyeng
dc.titleDoes early androgen exposure moderate developmental plasticity?eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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