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dc.contributor.advisorWilkins, Leeeng
dc.contributor.authorBelek, Cassandraeng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 3, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Lee Wilkins.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.description.abstractCongress is often overshadowed by the presidency in the mass media, and research into portrayals of Congress in the mass media is limited. This study seeks to add to existing scholarship on Congress in the mass media and specifically looks at how traditional journalism and fictional entertainment frame congressional power. Guided by framing theory and the social construction of reality, the study uses qualitative textual analysis to analyze articles from The Washington Post, The Washington Times, and The New York Times and episodes from The West Wing. The study employs literature on congressional history and Congress in the mass media to identify existing frames; however, the study also acknowledges additional frames that have not already been identified. The results show that both the newspaper sample and the West Wing sample predominately use conflict frames to portray congressional power. The conflict frames focus on conflict between parties, conflict between the legislative and executive branches, and even conflict between the chambers of Congress. Congressional power is framed as being dependent on these conflicts. The study shows how traditional journalism and fictional entertainment complement each other and suggests that the two types of media can affect citizens' social realities.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentv, 126 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb77767561eng
dc.identifier.oclc646512261eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/8067
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/8067eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Congresseng
dc.subject.lcshWest Wing (Television program)eng
dc.subject.lcshLegislative power -- In mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Political aspectseng
dc.titleCongress in the mass media : how the West Wing and traditional journalism frame Congressional powereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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