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Industry

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/8092

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Title: Industry
Author: Brown, Nancy Kim
Date: 2010
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: Artists throughout the centuries have infused their art with their ideological outlook in order to persuade, educate or shock target audiences. Typically, these ideologies, revolve around religious and political systems. However, they can also encompass unpopular and revolting subject matter that many people choose to avoid. I embrace this tactic in my art and cast myself in the role of social critic and propagandist. I create art with the intent to shed light on the effects of greed, because it serves as a disastrous catalyst for numerous problems within our society. These problems are addressed in my sculptures and prints by focusing on issues relating to agribusiness and the use of animals in industry. The general public is not exposed to sufficient information regarding these negative aspects. They include the annual abuse of billions of animals for human consumption, as well as for clothing and product testing. Environmental damage caused by feedlots and pesticides should be a major concern, but is often overlooked. People need information in order to make knowledgeable decisions concerning what they eat and what they feed their children. Therefore, by avoiding the abstract and the esoteric, and by creating visually appealing and potentially educational art, it is my intent to interest and inform my audience. This kind of easily-readable, propagandistic art can shed light on these subjects and is one step toward reform. Art holds an extraordinary power when it comes to influencing the masses and can be used as an educational tool to ignite positive social change. Like an artistic Pied Piper, this body of work is intended to lead an audience down the road to moral and culinary enlightenment.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/8092
Other Identifiers: BrownN-051810

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