Bat avoidance in the katydid genus Neoconocephalus

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Bat avoidance in the katydid genus Neoconocephalus

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/8105

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dc.contributor.advisor Schul, Johannes en_US
dc.contributor.author Kilmer, Mary K., 1983- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-03T19:18:49Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-03T19:18:49Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2010 Spring en_US
dc.identifier.other KilmerM-050710-T3342 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/8105
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 14, 2010). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Thesis advisor: Dr. Johannes Schul. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description M.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological science. en_US
dc.description.abstract The hearing system of the katydid genus Neoconocephalus has two functions: intraspecific communication and predator (bat) avoidance. Male calls and bat cries differ spectrally and temporally. Katydids must recognize and discriminate between signal types. We categorized bat avoidance behaviors and examined temporal and spectral recognition of bat cries behaviorally during tethered flight in several species of Neoconocephalus. Four bat avoidance behaviors were detected in Neoconocephalus katydids; steering, wingbeat interruption, dives and leg kicks. The first three behaviors were amplitude dependent, elicited by a single ultrasound pulse while the fourth was pulse-rate dependent. Steering and leg kicks were performed consistently in all species but wingstop (wingbeat interruption or dive) occurred significantly less often in N. robustus, N. bivocatus and N. exciliscanorus, all larger species. Single pulse experiments showed that katydids respond best to pulses with relatively short rise times and a minimum duration. Spectral experiments showed that both N. exciliscanorus and N. bivocatus were relatively insensitive to higher frequencies(>30 kHz) while N. robustus, N. retusus and N. ensiger were sensitive. Among these three species, spectral selectivity differed, with N. ensiger being very insensitive at 13kHz while N. retusus and N. robustus remained sensitive. We discuss how differences in body size, habitat and call type might account for the differences in bat avoidance. en_US
dc.format.extent viii, 55 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2010 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Katydids -- Effect of predation on en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Katydids -- Effect of sound on en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Insect sounds en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bat sounds en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bats -- Detection en_US
dc.title Bat avoidance in the katydid genus Neoconocephalus en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Biological sciences en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.A. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin b79329603
dc.identifier.oclc 648269619 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theses


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